Tag Archives: easter rising 1916

Collins Barracks – steeped in history

Collins Barracks has a unique distinction that is little known. For three centuries it housed both British and then Irish forces making it the oldest, continuously occupied barracks in the world. It was handed over in December 1922 to Irish Free State troops, led by General Richard Mulcahy, who immediately renamed it Collins Barracks, after Michael Collins the first-commander-in-chief of the Free State who had been killed on 22nd August in County Cork.

Museum Entrance

Museum Entrance

The Barracks were designed by Thomas Burgh, Queen Anne’s Surveyor General in Ireland, and are neo-classical in style. (Burgh was a very successful architect having also designed the Trinity College Library, Dr Steevens’ Hospital and St Werbugh’s Church.) Typically, the original work was added to over the time of its occupation with significant extensions added in the late 18th and 19th centuries. The site had been cleared for a large mansion for the Duke of Ormond, and it has several big squares, with Clarke’s Square the biggest.
After the place was de-militarised in 1997, when the 5th Battalion marched out for the last time, extensive renovation work was undertaken before it was open to the public as part of the National Museum of Ireland. In fact, the work carried out in Clarke’s Square won the state’s highest award for architectural conservation, the Silver Medal for Conservation.

Clarke Square

Clarke Square

When the government decided in 1988 to vacate the barracks as a military facility, plans were drawn up for an alternate use. Eventually it became the Museum of Decorative Arts and History and was opened by Sile deValera, Minister for Arts, Heritage, Gaeltacht and the Islands, on the 18th September 1997. It is a big building and there is much to see, as there are many permanent exhibitions; namely The Asgard, Eileen Grey, The Way We Wore, Irish Silver and The Easter Rising – Understanding 1916 to name but a few. And, of course, there are temporary exhibitions and shows, which are very popular, as is the café on Clarke’s Square. Check it out.

Front Entrance

Front Entrance

 

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Back to school

An Taoiseach - Enda Kenny

An Taoiseach – Enda Kenny

2014 is a big year for my old school as it is celebrating its   sesquicentennial – 150 years – and the programme of events was started by, none other than, An Taoiseach, Enda Kenny.

The school initially catered for pupils from the local, inner city, area but over time attracted many from the burgeoning suburbs due to its high academic achievements. And although the number of students is down on what it was at its peak in 1960s-1980s, it is now a co-educational school and also catering for a new ethnic mix – a symbol of Ireland’s current and future generations.

1886 School Register

1886 School Register

On the day of his visit the Taoiseach viewed old registers showing the  school’s most famous pupils, brothers Padraig and Willie Pearse. A number of other pupils, including Michael Malone who was killed in the fighting for Mount Street Bridge during the Easter Rising 1916, are also recorded. On the other side, many former students joined the army and fought against Germany during the Great War. One family, the Brennocks who lived close by, lost three of their sons in that sad conflict.

The celebrations have begun well and we now look forward to the other interesting and enjoyable events to come.

Michael O'Sullivan, An Taoiseach & DC

Michael O’Sullivan, An Taoiseach & DC

 

Check out the Past Pupils’ Union website for more details.

Credit: Final photo by rockphotography

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Royal College of Surgeons – A cut above

During the recent Heritage Week I took the opportunity of visiting ‘Surgeons’, a place that I, and many Dubliners, pass daily but never enter. The site was previously an abandoned Quaker graveyard, with the first College building erected in 1810. The beautiful Georgian building you see today is anextension of that and was finished in 1825.

William Dease

William Dease

The College dates back a little further to 11th February 1784 when it received its charter from George III, and it held its first meeting in the boardroom of the Rotunda Hospital on 2 March. Among those present on that auspicious day were the first president, Professor Samuel Croker-King, and William Dease, the first professor of surgery. It is important to note that admission was not barred on sectarian grounds, as was the custom of the time. In fact, Dease was one of a dozen Catholics to become president of the college. (Curious thing: Dease committed suicide and there are at least three different versions as to the circumstances, but nobody knows for sure. However, he cut his femoral artery, and his statue (in the Main Entrance) shows a dark line at exactly where the fatal cut may have been made!)

Sir William Wilde

Sir William Wilde

Over the years many of the college’s former students have made famous contributions to medicine, and beyond. William Wallace (1791-1837) studied dermatology in London under Thomas Bateman, and it was here that he learned about inoculation and vaccination. When he returned to Dublin he opened the first hospital in the British Isles to treat skin disease. Charles Cameron (1830-1921) was as the forefront of hygiene and public health, and was granted the Freedom of Dublin for his work. The McDonnells, father John (1796-1892) and son Robert (1828-1889) both made significant medical firsts. John is known as being the first person in Ireland to use ether as inhalation anaesthesia during the amputation of an arm in the Richmond Hospital on New Year’s Day 1847. And, on 20th April 1865 Robert preformed the first human blood transfusion in Ireland on a young girl in Dublin’s Jervis Street Infirmary. He was elected President of the College in 1877.
Sir William Wilde (father of the playwright Oscar), founded St Mark’s Ophthalmic Hospital, and it was later amalgamated with the National Eye hospital to form the well-known Royal Victoria Eye and Ear Hospital. Oliver St John Gogarty, a surgeon renowned for his dexterity and speed, had a few more strings to his bow. He was a Free State Senator; wrote books, plays, poetry and is forever remembered as the inspiration for Buck Mulligan (a medical student!), the first character we meet in James Joyce’s Ulysses. His poem Tailteann Ode won a bronze medal at the 1924 Olympic Games. And there is a fine paining of him by one of Ireland’s greatest artists, Sir William Orpen, in the President’s Room.

Bullet hole

Bullet hole

During the Easter Rising the building on St Stephen’s Green was occupied by members of the Irish Citizen army, under the command of Michael Mallin and Countess Markievicz. Gunfire from Crown forces based in the Shelbourne Hotel raked the building, and numerous marks can be seen on its front. One smashed into a door  in the Board Room and its mark is still there.   Volunteers stayed in place until the final order to surrender was given. A few, however, did leave a mark by carving their names into a pillar.

The College began a long period of expansion from the mid-1960s under the guidance of Harry O’Flanagan. The old Mercer Hospital was acquired and it houses a library, college archives, heritage collections and student accommodation. Other properties on York Street (opposite the College) have been acquired and are currently being re-developed. Beaumont Hospital is now the main centre for medical training, and advanced research work. And the international aspect has increased in recent years with schools in Bahrain and Malaysia. The college is recognised as a world centre of medical excellence, and there are over sixty countries represented in the current study body.

'Surgeons' - St Stephen's Green

‘Surgeons’ – St Stephen’s Green

* Sir William Wilde photo courtesy of RCSI

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Dublin’s City Hall

The Central Dome

The Central Dome

Dublin has many Georgian buildings and City Hall, built between 1769-1779, is one of its finest examples. Designed by Thomas Cooley, after he won a prize for its design, it is a first-rate example of the neo-classical style that was fashionable at the time in many European countries.

It was built as the place where Dublin merchants could meet, buy and sell goods, and pay with bills of exchange – hence its original name, the Royal Exchange. The central space, Rotunda, has a magnificent dome that is supported by twelve columns, and is surrounded by an ambulatory where the merchants met and did business. There are twelve murals, eight depicting famous Irish figures and the other four representing each of the Ireland’s provinces. In the centre of the floor, directly beneath the dome, is a large mosaic depicting the Coat of Arms of Dublin ‘Obedientia Civium Urbis Felicitas’ (The Obedience of the citizens produces a happy city).

Dublin City's motto

Dublin City’s motto

The Act of Union in 1800 had a negative effect of the city’s economy, and the Royal Exchange went into decline. Dublin Corporation bought the building in 1851, converted it for its civic offices, and re-named it City Hall on 30th September 1852.

Like many other buildings in central Dublin it played a part in the Easter Rising of City1 1916. On the first day of action it was occupied by Volunteers of the Irish Citizen Army under Captain Sean Connolly. Being next door to the British HQ in Dublin Castle it soon came under intense and sustained fire, and Connolly was shot dead by a sniper. Under continuous attack the Volunteers abandoned the building later that night.

Today, Dublin City Council holds its meetings in the old Council Chamber, and in the  refurbished crypt the exhibition ‘Story of Dublin’ is very informative, using a mix of old newsreel, video and a display of artefacts.

 

 

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